Audio Walks

Lancaster Arts | Contact Theatre | Unity Theatre

Our audio walks are hosted in partnership with Go Jauntly App. 

From a collection of personal stories of grief, from women, we create bespoke audio walks that will take you on a journey - for one person at a time. Weaving place, grief, loss, and communal rituals in the landscape. Connecting you with those that have walked before you and those still to come.

 

Images by Luke Bryant

1 to 1 Performance

A Home for Grief is an experience for one person at a time that begins with a sound-walk through the cityscape. On your journey you will listen on headphones to the voices of local people from different backgrounds, sharing how they take care of their dead and themselves.

The trail will lead you to a home. In this private space you will be guided through an intimate experience exploring care, memory, ritual and grief. Entering alone, your presence will contribute to a tender conversation on how we say goodbye.

Images: Phil Daley

Installation
The installation contains a collection of audio-visual artworks, featuring five quilted maps: these maps chart grief landscapes that we may find inside ourselves. This collection forms a space of warmth and reflection, where you are welcome to listen, to look, and offer your own experiences if you wish.

So far we have installed it at in a gallery, theatre and an unused church. 

Images: Will Dickie & Fabiola Santana

Reviews

 

‘Unique and deeply personal theatre experience which deftly and mindfully navigates difficult subject matter […] Perhaps now more than ever before we need A Home for Grief where […] we feel witnessed, connected, comforted.’

Live Art Alive

 

A Home for Grief Captures the sense of loss many of us are feeling after the coronavirus pandemic and how we might or might not deal with that. It’s deep, it’s profound and deeply personal and it might just have you on the edge of tears, but definitely worth the experience.’

Stagey Lady

 

So, when no longer used for religious purposes, it feels entirely right that they be repurposed for other ways, like this, for people to come together to connect with each other.   This installation was a perfect example of this in action.   All of us there were, at the same time, experiencing something very personal, but together in this beautiful space, and this was very soothing.  It felt shared and safe. 
Allison Burke, Churches Conservation Trust

'That is, probably, the lesson I take from grief. Even when it all seems dead and abandoned, life still finds its small ways of returning.'
Maria Gulina
 

Audience Feedback

‘A unique and ‘tailored process of mourning’ 
 ’the best pieces of art I’ve ever seen’ ‘Deep immersion in personal & shared grieving with Fabiola & diverse life & death experiences of women make A Home for Grief a profound moment...Social arts practice beyond the superficial opening up some bigger questions...’ ‘I feel so moved. To have the chance to quietly feel in such an intimate setting is a precious gift. The whole experience was perfect. So gentle, thought provoking and kind.’ ‘This is a beautiful experience, and very emotional. The grief I carry is for two miscarriages, so it is for life not lived, and a lost future. There is little ritual around these losses, so thank you for creating a space to hold it’ ‘Big and important ideas beautifully, gently and challengingly explored.' ‘I’m [in my thirties], why is this the first point in my life where I have been able to process death outside of a funeral? And outside of my own bedroom.’ ‘A beautiful and deeply moving experience — reminds me how poorly we learn about to process grief. And the power of gentleness, love and touch. I will remember this — thank you for a precious gift.’ ‘I’m struck by the combination of the warmth of the sun and the performer’s body, and the cold of the stone floor and my remembrance of my parent’s dead bodies... very special.’ ‘...the one that really struck me and I think I cried at this point actually was walking up to the tree with all the different height markings on it, and seeing all those dozens of different height markings spread out in lots of different ways and then marking my own height, because that’s something that I know lots of families do but it’s something that my family did [...] and there’s still a door frame back in my parents’ house that’s got our heights marked on it...’ ‘I don’t think I was expecting it to be as powerful or as personal or poignant as it was [...] I have been on audio sound walk type things before prior to that, and I was never I was never super impressed by them [...] it was the first audio tour type thing that I actually really enjoyed and thought yes this is absolutely the correct medium to deliver this within.’ ‘...the box was already full of flowers when I put mine down and that was poignant, I could feel myself choking up [...] And I think the way that you do those activities had a sense of like sort of joint ritual to it, which is really nice, like secular grieving ritual and that was really touching and really beautiful’ ‘I particularly liked the lamp post that we marked with chalk, and in many ways it was the ordinariness and the lack of overt symbolism that I liked, it’s just an ordinary rather dilapidated lamp post. But something about, it had a sense of history there, which made you feel that other people had been there before and you were the latest people to be there.’ ‘...the activities that you did were really great because they gave you space to experience it about anything that you wanted to experience it about. They gave you space to do it in any way you wanted to do it and any timeframe you wanted to do it in. And you could rush it if you wanted to, you could just get it over and done with, but each one was just a small ritualised sort of remembrance and I really liked that.’ ‘...the artist had this really really clear understanding as to when to kind of come back into the frame and suddenly they’re there and it’s almost like they’re sat next to you and it’s just that little sense of reassurance. And then they know where and when you want to be on your own and when you need them there to be a little bit with you. That I think was very very effective.’ ‘... what I really really appreciated was just the plurality of different voices on grief, and those moments where you needed that adequate space to walk out and reflect on what’s just been said, and those moments to sit and ponder.’ ‘I don’t think I was expecting it to be as powerful or as personal or poignant as it was [...] I have been on audio sound walk type things before prior to that, and I was never I was never super impressed by them [...] it was the first audio tour type thing that I actually really enjoyed and thought yes this is absolutely the correct medium to deliver this within.’ 
 ‘...the box was already full of flowers when I put mine down and that was poignant, I could feel myself choking up [...] And I think the way that you do those activities had a sense of like sort of joint ritual to it, which is really nice, like secular grieving ritual and that was really touching and really beautiful’ ‘it’s like you were in one bit of time together, doing the same activity. And I really enjoyed that.’ ‘I just found that my reflection mixed with [Fabiola’s] dad’s reflection and then my thoughts mixed with her voice and it was like we were one big family, it was like we were all experiencing this thing called grief together’ ‘At times there were high levels of emotions [and it] brought home to me how fragile life is and how close we all are to death’ 
 ‘there’s something inherently powerful about standing over what in a sense is you know a representation of your body, and watching somebody perform essentially last rites on you, and then you’re helping put that body away you know and seeing that treatment, that’s a glimpse that nobody gets to see [...] being able to be present for that I think was just it was a bit of a gift really [...] there was just a real great power in that really but just really was a profound effect and moving.’ one can’t help but feel that you’re not on your own here, you’re not kind of stood out here because you’ve got all these echoes, this kind of palimpsest, this layer of everyone who’s come before you ‘the most personal a show has ever felt and I’ve been to a lot of shows’ ‘...the tapestries, the different women were beautiful, and really inspiring and really really clear [...] I really enjoyed the process of hearing the story around them and hearing how they came to be and hearing what had impacted them...’ ‘I’ve literally had the most vivid few weeks since [AHFG] everything is more vivid, everything’s more accurate, I’m really in the space of feeling more present with my children. Honestly, it’s been incredible [...] it’s been a really fantastic few weeks.’ ‘I do feel as though I have gotten a lot of [...] strength from knowing what others have been through and what others have experienced and also realising [...] how this feels, it’s a universal experience you know like it’s bizarre how little we talk about grief [...] it was my first encounter of other stories, that relate to what I was experiencing at the time [...] it felt like the first time I’d encountered somewhere where it really went in depth, it wasn’t just like oh I’m so sorry for your loss [...] it actually went really deep’ ‘Fabiola is simply wonderful — she provided peacefulness, warmth, comfort and love throughout the whole, unique experience...unexpected, affecting and exceptionally thoughtful. Memorable!’ ‘So very moving and beautiful. Many complex layers weaving and flowing. Gentle and lovingly played — not quite the right word. This will live with me. Thank you. I step out of this house changed.’ ‘What a beautiful experience — the walk, the sunshine, the flowers, the supportive people along the way — and the ladybirds on the railings! And then in the cottage, such a powerful ritual’ ‘A rare and precious experience. As a young person making theatre 35 years ago this is what I hoped theatre could become. Essential, personal, meaningful, vital, joyous, and a gift between people’ ‘An incredible experience, stirring, touching, lots to process. Thank you’ ‘A beautiful experience, brought back painful memories, but felt safe.’ ‘Thank you, so much to think about. The light flickering across the cloth was beautiful, fleeting and bright. That was enough to express everything’